Author Archives: admin

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Visa Processing times for UK Visas from Hyderabad. India – May 2017

Category : UK

Visits Visas

Long Term Visit (more than 6 months)

Most applications are processed within 10 days.

Number of days to process application 2 days 3 days 5 days 110 days 15 days
% of applications decided 1% 21% 36% 97% 100%

Note: actual processing times may vary depending on a range of factors.

General Visit (6 months or less)

Most applications are processed within 10 days.

Number of days to process application 3 days 5 days 10 days 15 days 30 days
% of applications decided 9% 16% 95% 99% 100%

Note: actual processing times may vary depending on a range of factors.

Business Visit (6 months or less)

Most applications are processed within 10 days.

Number of days to process application 3 days 5 days 10 days 15 days
% of applications decided 24% 44% 96% 100%

Note: actual processing times may vary depending on a range of factors.

Family Visit (6 months or less)

Most applications are processed within 10 days.

Number of days to process application 3 days 5 days 10 days 15 days 30 days
% of applications decided 3% 6% 95% 98% 100%

Note: actual processing times may vary depending on a range of factors.

Transit (6 months or less)

Most applications are processed within 30 days.

Number of days to process application 10 days 15 days 30 days
% of applications decided 16% 50% 100%

Note: actual processing times may vary depending on a range of factors.

Other Visit (6 months or less)

Most applications are processed within 15 days.

Number of days to process application 2 days 3 days 5 days 10 days 15 days
% of applications decided 2% 12% 22% 89% 100%

Note: actual processing times may vary depending on a range of factors.

Points Based System Visas

PBS Tier 1

Most applications are processed within 15 days.

Number of days to process application 3 days 5 days 10 days 15 days
% of applications decided 10% 30% 40% 100%

Note: actual processing times may vary depending on a range of factors.

PBS Tier 2

Most applications are processed within 15 days.

Number of days to process application 2 days 3 days 5 days 10 days 15 days 30 days 60 days
% of applications decided 20% 35% 39% 47% 97% 99% 100%

Note: actual processing times may vary depending on a range of factors.

PBS Tier 4

Most applications are processed within 30 days.

Number of days to process application 5 days 10 days 15 days 30 days
% of applications decided 22% 22% 88% 100%

Note: actual processing times may vary depending on a range of factors.

PBS Tier 5

Most applications are processed within 15 days.

Number of days to process application 3 days 5 days 10 days 15 days
% of applications decided 25% 25% 50% 100%

Note: actual processing times may vary depending on a range of factors.

Other Non Settlement Visas

EEA Family Permits

Most applications are processed within 60 days.

Number of days to process application 60 days
% of applications decided 100%

Note: actual processing times may vary depending on a range of factors.

Other Non-Settlement

Most applications are processed within 15 days.

Number of days to process application 5 days 10 days 15 days
% of applications decided 50% 50% 100%

Note: actual processing times may vary depending on a range of factors.

Settlement Visas

Settlement

Most applications are processed within 60 days.

Number of days to process application 15 days 30 days 60 days
% of applications decided 16% 33% 100%

Source : Home Office.gov.uk


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About Schengen Visa.

Category : Schengen

What is Schengen Visa ?

A Schengen Visa is the document issued by the appropriate authorities to the interested party for visiting/travelling to and within the Schengen Area.

Schengen Area:

The Schengen area is comprised of 26 countries that have agreed to allow free movement of their citizens within this area as a single country. Of the 26 countries bound by the Schengen agreement , 22 are part of the EU and the other 4 are part of the EFTA.

The Schengen Visa was introduced to make travelling faster and easier between all the EU countries that signed up for the agreement. The benefits of pre-applying for a Schengen Visa mean that once any Schengen member country has issued a visa, the holder of that visa can move freely between member countries. This avoids the need to apply for multiple visas for the EU countries they intend to visit, reducing cost and paperwork. Those wishing to tour several European countries, either for business or pleasure, can benefit from the freedom of movement provided by the Schengen Treaty and Visa.

Passport holders from countries that need a visa to enter Europe need to make their visa application before arriving in Europe. Once a visa is granted, the visa holder can enter and travel through all the countries within the Schengen area. As visa extensions can be complicated to obtain, we strongly advise travellers to plan their trip to stay within the original Schengen Visa timescale to remain compliant with all Schengen rules. Currently, a Schengen Visa permits the holder to stay within the Schengen countries for up to 90 days in any period of 180 days. To learn more about whether you need a Schengen visa and how to apply for one, you should first Apply for the Schengen Application Guide.

Schengen Countries / Schengen Area

Currently the Schengen agreement applies to 26 member countries*, including four which are not members of the European Union (EU). The UK and Ireland are members of the European Union (EU) but have opted out of Schengen, preferring to operate a system of Common Travel Area border controls with the EU. Iceland and Norway are part of the Nordic Passport Union and are therefore classified as “states associated with the Schengen activities of the EU”, although they are not actually EU members. Switzerland has similarly participated in Schengen since 2008, and on 19 December, 2011, Liechtenstein joined the Schengen Area. Other de facto members of the Schengen Area include three European microstates — Monaco, San Marino and the Vatican City. They have semi-open or open borders with neighbouring countries which are Schengen members.

Bulgaria*, Croatia, Cyprus and Romania* are the remaining EU members and once compliance is met, they will also join the Schengen Area. They need to meet the Schengen standards of preparedness in the areas of personal data protection, visas, air borders and police cooperation and this requires EU experts visiting and assessing various workplaces and institutions in each country to assess their standards of compliance.

*As of April 2016, the European Commission believes that both Romania and Bulgaria have met all the requirements necessary and all that stands in the way of them joining the Schengen Area is a unanimous vote by the other EU Member States.

Schengen Visa History :

The original Schengen Agreement was agreed and signed by half of the 10 EU member states at that time. Schengen came into being on 14 June 1985 and took its name from the nearby town of Schengen in Luxembourg as it was signed in neutral territory nearby. As all the EU member countries could not agree on the elimination of border controls, the Schengen Area had to be separately negotiated country by country for those within the European Community which existed at that time.

A later agreement proposed the abolishing of internal border controls and a Schengen visa policy was adopted in 1990. It was known as the Schengen Convention. It led to the adoption of the agreement and rules which remained entirely separate from the EU structure, with the resulting Schengen Area being established on 26 March 1995.

With the agreement of additional EU member states signing the Schengen Agreement, eventually it became part of EU procedures and was incorporated into EU law with the Amsterdam Treaty in 1997, effective from 1999. As it is now part of European law, non-EU members are not allowed to participate in any changes of regulation or amendments to Schengen.

In the case of the UK and Ireland, the two countries have enjoyed an agreed Common Travel Area (CTA) since 1923. However, the UK was given a full opt-out from the Schengen Area as it was unwilling to abolish border controls with the remaining Schengen countries. Ireland has always appeared to favour being part of Schengen, but in order to maintain its open border with UK-governed Northern Ireland as part of the CTA, it has not signed the Schengen Treaty. The Nordic countries required that the non-EU members of Norway and Iceland be included in Schengen in order to reach a consensus, and this was agreed.


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JRR Sports Information

Category : sports

ALL SPORTS LOVERS – JRR PROVIDES VISIT VISA TO SEE YOUR FAVOURATE MATCH AND PLAYERS AT THE SAID VENUES

WE AT JRR TAKE CARE OF ALL YOUR IMMIGRATION NEEDS WHICH REQUIRE TO TRAVEL WITH YOUR FAMILY AND FRIENDS TO SEE YOUR FAVOURATE SPORTS STARS AND MATCHES.

NOTE : FOR ALL VISIT VISA APPLY ONE MONTH BEFORE THE SPORTS EVENT.  WE ALSO OFFER BEST AIR FARES, FOREX, TRAVEL INSURANCE, HOTEL ACCOMMODATION AND VISA GUIDANCE SERVICES. WE OFFER DISCOUNTS FOR GROUP BOOKINGS MAX-10.

COME TO JRR AND ENJOY TO WATCH THE BEST ….

BELOW ARE THE FEW SPORTS EVENTS  – 2022.

Date(s) Sport Event Location
Jan 9 – Feb 6 Football (Soccer) Africa Cup of Nations Cameroon
Jan 17-30 Tennis Australian Open Melbourne, Australia
Jan 21-23 Extreme Sports Winter X Games 26 Aspen, Colorado, USA
Feb 4-20 Multi-sports Winter Olympics Beijing, China
Feb 5 – Mar 19 Rugby Six Nations UK, Ireland, France & Italy
Feb 13 Football (American) Super Bowl Inglewood, California
Mar 4-13 Multi-sports Winter Paralympics Beijing, China
Mar 4 – Apr 3 Cricket ODI World Cup for women New Zealand
Mar 22-27 (postponed from 2021) Multi-sports Winter Military World Games Berchtesgaden and Ruhpolding, Germany
Apr 7-10 Golf Masters Augusta, Georgia, USA
Apr 9 Horse Racing Grand National Aintree Racecourse in Liverpool
Apr 16-22 Multi-sports Invictus Games The Hague, Netherlands
Apr 16 – May 2 Snooker World Snooker Championship Crucible Theatre in Sheffield, England
May 7 Horse Racing Kentucky Derby Louisville, Kentucky, US
May 12-23 (postponed from 2021) Multi-sports South-East Asian Games Hanoi, Vietnam
May 13-29 (postponed from 2021) Multi-sports World Masters Games (Summer) Kansai, Japan
May 13-29 Ice Hockey IIHF World Championship Finland
May 19-22 Golf US PGA Southern Hills Country Club, Tulsa, Oklahoma
May 22 – Jun 5 Tennis French Open Paris, France
May 28 Football (Soccer) UEFA Champions League Final Stade de France, Saint-Denis, France
May 29 Auto Racing Indianapolis 500 Indianapolis, USA
Jun 2-16 Basketball NBA Finals Boston & San Francisco
Jun 15-28 Ice Hockey Stanley Cup finals Tampa & Denver, USA
Jun 16-19 Golf US Open The Country Club Brookline, Massachusetts
Jun 18 – July 3 Swimming World Aquatics Championships Budapest, Hungary
June 26 – July 7 (postponed to 2023) Multi-sports 2021 Summer Universiade Chengdu, China
Jun 27 – Jul 10 Tennis Wimbledon London, England
Jul 1-17 Field Hockey Women’s FIH Hockey World Cup Terrassa, Spain and Amstelveen, Netherlands
Jul 1-24 Cycling Tour de France France
Jul 7-17 (postponed from 2021) Multi-sports World Games Birmingham, Alabama, USA
Jul 14-17 Golf The Open Championship Old Course at St Andrews St Andrews Fife Scotland
Jul 15-24 (postponed from 2021) Athletics IAAF World Championships Eugene, Oregon USA
July 20-24 Extreme Sports Summer X Games California, USA
Jul 22- Jul 31 (postponed from 2021) Multi-sports World Police and Fire Games Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
Jul 24-31 Cycling Tour de France Femmes France
Jul 28 – Aug 8 Multi-sports Commonwealth Games Birmingham, England
Jul 28 – Aug 8 American Football IFAF Women’s American Football Championships Vantaa Finland
Aug 6-14 Equestrian FEI World Equestrian Games Herning, Denmark
Aug 9-18 (postponed from 2021) Multi-sports Islamic Solidarity Games Konya, Türkiye
Aug 11–21 Multi-sports European Sports Championships Munich, Germany
Aug 26 – Sep 11 Volleyball World Volleyball Championships (men) Russia
Aug 29 – Sep 11 Tennis US Open New York, USA
Sep 9-11 Rugby 7s Rugby World Cup Sevens Cape Town, South Africa
Sep 10-25 (postponed) Multi-sports Asian Games Hangzhou, China
Sept (canceled) Air Sports World Air Games Türkiye
Sep 18-25 Cycling UCI Road World Championships Wollongong, Australia
Sep 18-25 Rowing World Rowing Championships Račice, Czechia
Sep 19-25 (postponed from 2021) Golf Presidents Cup Quail Hollow Club, Charlotte, North Carolina
Sep 22-Oct 1 Basketball FIBA Women’s Basketball World Cup Sydney, Australia
Sep 23 – Oct 15 Volleyball World Volleyball Championships (women) Netherlands & Poland
Sept 24 AFL Grand Final Melbourne, Australia
Sep 30 – Oct 9 Table Tennis World Championship Chengdu, China
Oct 1-15 Multi-Sports South American Games Asunción, Paraguay
Oct 2 Rugby League NRL Grand Final Sydney
Oct 8 – Nov 12 (postponed from 2021) Rugby Womens World Cup New Zealand
Oct? Baseball World Series ?
Oct 12-16 Cycling World Track Championships Montigny-le-Bretonneux, France
Oct 15 – Nov 19 (postponed from 2021) Rugby League World Cup England
Oct 16 – Nov 13 Cricket ICC World T20 (men) Australia
Oct (postponed to 2026) Multi-sports Summer Youth Olympics Dakar, Senegal
Nov 1 Horse Racing Melbourne Cup Victoria, Australia
Nov 11-19 (postponed until Nov 2023) Multi-sports Gay Games Hong Kong, China
Nov-Dec? Weightlifting World Championships Chongqing, China Bogota, Colombia
Nov 21-Dec 18 Football (Soccer) FIFA World Cup Qatar
Dec 13-18 Swimming FINA World Swimming Championships (25m) Kazan, Russia Melbourne, Australia

note: any date and time listed represent the local date and time

disclaimer: Please note that event dates are believed to be correct at the time of publication, though they are subject to change.

FOR MORE INFORMATION :

JRR TEAM

PHONE NO. 0091 7893638689

Email : jrrindia@gmail.com


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If your UK visa application is delayed…

Category : UK

You can find out why your immigration application is delayed by contacting the Home Office. You might want to make sure your passport will be returned in time for a holiday, or simply be worried about how long the decision is taking.
You can do this yourself rather than paying an expensive lawyer or immigration expert to do it for you.

Your immigration status

Your immigration status will stay the same while you wait for your new visa if:
you made the application before your most recent visa ended
you made the application during the 28-day ‘grace’ period after it expired
Your rights – for example, the ability to work, access education and receive benefits – will stay the same while you wait for a new visa.

Contact the Home Office

You can phone the UK Visas and Immigration contact center (part of the Home Office) to find out how long your visa will take:
UK Visas and Immigration contact centre


Telephone:0300 123 2241

Textphone: 0800 389 8289


UK Timings: Monday to Thursday, 9am to 4.45pm. Friday, 9am to 4.30pm.

The service can be busy, so you may be waiting for some time.
You’ll be asked for a Home Office reference number (sometimes called a ‘case ID’).
This number will start with the first letter of your last name, and be followed by 7 numbers. You’ll have received this number when you first applied.
Before you can get any information about your application, you’ll be asked questions to confirm your identity.  For example, you might need:
important dates – like the date you submitted your application
any reference numbers you’ve received in letters or over the phone

Contact JRR

for following up of your application status with UK Visas and Immigration Contact Center.

Phone:- 0091 40 65150789

E-mail:- contact@jrrindia.com


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BRITISH NATIONALITY AND CITIZENSHIP

Category : UK

British Citizen: A child born outside the UK on or after 1 January 1983 automatically acquires British citizenship by descent if either parent is a British citizen otherwise than by descent at the time of the birth.

British Nationality: A British national who is of the major classes of British Nationality under British Nationality Law, holders of this nationality are British nationals , but not British citizens.

British Passport: A British passports may be issued to people holding any of the various forms of British nationality, and may be used as evidence of the bearer’s British nationality, and also, if applicable, evidence of the right of abode in the United Kingdom or evidence of citizenship of the European Union, or both. In 2016, British citizens had visa-free or visa-on-arrival access to 175 countries and territories.

There are 6 different types of British nationality. These are:

  • British citizenship
  • British overseas territories citizen
  • British overseas citizen
  • British subject
  • British national (overseas)
  • British protected person

British citizenship
If you were born in the UK before 1 January 1983

You became a British citizen on 1 January 1983 if both of the following apply:
you were a citizen of the UK and Colonies
you had the ‘right of abode’ in the UK

‘Right of abode’ means you:
are entirely free from UK Immigration Control and don’t need permission from an Immigration Officer to enter the UK
can live and work in the UK without restriction

This includes people who:
were born in the UK
were born in a British colony and had the right of abode in the UK
have been naturalised in the UK
had registered as a citizen of the UK and Colonies
could prove legitimate descent from a father to whom one of these applies
If you were born in the UK on or after 1 January 1983
You don’t automatically get British citizenship if you were born in the UK.
If you were born on or after 1 January 1983, you’ll be a British citizen

if your mother or father was either:
a British citizen when you were born
‘settled’ in the UK when you were born
In most cases you’ll be a British citizen if your mother or father was born in the UK or naturalised there at the time of your birth.
If you were born before July 2006, your father’s British nationality will normally only pass to you if he was married to your mother at the time of your birth.

British overseas territories citizen
British overseas territories citizenship was called ‘British dependent territories citizenship’ before 26 February 2002.
If you were born before 1 January 1983

You became a British overseas territories citizen on 1 January 1983 if both of these applied:
you were a citizen of the United Kingdom and Colonies on 31 December 1982
you had connections with a British overseas territory because you, your parents or your grandparents were born, registered or naturalised in that British overseas territory
You also became a British overseas territories citizen if you were a woman married to a man who became a British overseas territories citizen on 1 January 1983.
If you were born on or after 1 January 1983

You’re a British overseas territories citizen if both the following apply:
you were born in a British overseas territory
at the time of your birth one of your parents was a British overseas territories citizen or legally settled in a British overseas territory

You’re also a British overseas territories citizen if one of the following applies:
you were adopted in an overseas territory by a British overseas territories citizen
you were born outside the overseas territory to a parent who gained British overseas territories citizenship in their own right (known as ‘otherwise than by descent’)
Rights as a British overseas territories citizen

You can:
hold a British passport
get consular assistance and protection from UK diplomatic posts
Unless you’re also a British citizen:
you’re still subject to immigration controls – you don’t have the automatic right to live or work in the UK
you aren’t considered a UK national by the European Union (EU)

British overseas citizen

You became a British overseas citizen on 1 January 1983

if both of these applied:
you were a citizen of the United Kingdom and Colonies on 31 December 1982
you didn’t become either a British citizen or a British overseas territories citizen on 1 January 1983
Hong Kong
If you were a British overseas territories citizen only because of your connection with Hong Kong you lost that citizenship on 30 June 1997 when sovereignty returned to China.

However, you became a British overseas citizen if either:
you had no other nationality and would have become stateless
you were born on or after 1 July 1997 and would have been born stateless if one of your parents was a British national (overseas) or British overseas citizen when you were born
Rights as a British overseas citizen

You can:
hold a British passport
get consular assistance and protection from UK diplomatic posts

Unless you’re also a British citizen:
you’re still subject to immigration controls – you don’t have the automatic right to live or work in the UK
you aren’t considered a UK national by the European Union (EU)
Become a British overseas citizen
You can only apply to become a British overseas citizen in limited circumstances.
Stateless people.

You may be able to register as a British overseas citizen if you’re stateless (not recognised by any country as having a nationality) and both of these apply:
you were born in the UK or an overseas territory
one of your parents is a British overseas citizen

You may also be able to register if you’re stateless and all of these apply:
you were born outside the UK and qualifying territories
one of your parents is a British overseas citizen
you’ve lived in the UK or an overseas territory for 3 years or more

You have to fill in different forms depending on whether you were:
born before 1 January 1983
born on or after 1 January 1983

Children
A child under 18 can be registered as a British overseas citizen in special circumstances.

British subject
Until 1949, nearly everyone with a close connection to the United Kingdom was called a ‘British subject’.
All citizens of Commonwealth countries were British subjects until January 1983.
Since 1983, very few people have qualified as British subjects.

Who is a British subject ?
You became a British subject on 1 January 1983 if, until then,

you were either:
a British subject without citizenship, which means you were a British subject on 31 December 1948 who didn’t become a citizen of the UK and Colonies, a Commonwealth country, Pakistan or the Republic of Ireland
a person who had been a citizen of the Republic of Ireland on 31 December 1948 and had made a claim to remain a British subject
You also became a British subject on 1 January 1983 if you were a woman who registered as a British subject on the basis of your marriage to a man in one of these categories.
Republic of Ireland citizens
You’re a British subject if you were a citizen of the Republic of Ireland on 31 December 1948 and made a claim to remain a British subject.

If you didn’t make a claim to remain a British subject you can apply to the Home Secretary to become a British subject if either:
you’ve been in Crown service for the UK government
you’re associated with the UK or a British overseas territory by descent, residence or another way

Children of British subjects
British subjects can’t normally pass on that status to their children if the children were born after 1 January 1983.

However, a child may be a British subject if they were born on or after 1 January 1983 in the UK or a British overseas territory and all the following apply when they are born:
one of their parents is a British subject
neither parent is a British citizen, British overseas territories citizen or British overseas citizen
Rights as a British subject

You can:
hold a British passport
get consular assistance and protection from UK diplomatic posts

However, you:
are usually subject to immigration controls and don’t have the automatic right to live or work in the UK (there are only rare exceptions to this)
aren’t considered a UK national by the European Union (EU)

British national (overseas)
Someone who was a British overseas territories citizen by connection with Hong Kong was able to register as a British national (overseas) before 1 July 1997.
British overseas territories citizens from Hong Kong who didn’t register as British nationals (overseas) and had no other nationality or citizenship on 30 June 1997 became British overseas citizens on 1 July 1997.
Rights as a British national (overseas)

You can:
hold a British passport
get consular assistance and protection from UK diplomatic posts

However, you:
are subject to immigration controls and don’t have the automatic right to live or work in the UK
aren’t considered a UK national by the European Union (EU)

British protected person
You would have become a British protected person on 1 January 1983

if you:
were a citizen or national of Brunei
were already a British protected person
would otherwise have been born stateless (without a country) in the UK or an overseas territory because, when you were born, one of your parents was a British protected person

In most cases you would have lost your British protected person status if:
you gained any other nationality or citizenship
the territory you were connected with became independent and you became a citizen of that country
Rights as a British protected person

You can:
hold a British passport
get consular assistance and protection from UK diplomatic posts

However, you:
are subject to immigration controls and don’t have the automatic right to live or work in the UK
aren’t considered a UK national by the European Union (EU)
Become a British protected person

You may be able to register as a British protected person only if all the following apply:
you’re stateless and always have been
you were born in the UK or an overseas territory
your father or mother was a British protected person when you were born

You can apply for British citizenship by naturalisation if:
you’re 18 or over
you’re of good character, for example, you don’t have a serious or recent criminal record, and you haven’t tried to deceive the Home Office or been involved in immigration offences in the last 10 years
you’ll continue to live in the UK
you’ve met the knowledge of English and life in the UK requirements
you meet the residency requirement

And you must usually have:
lived in the UK for at least the 5 years before the date of your application
spent no more than 450 days outside the UK during those 5 years
spent no more than 90 days outside the UK in the last 12 months
had a settlement (‘indefinite leave to remain’) in the UK for the last 12 months if you’re from outside the European Economic Area (EEA)
had permanent residence status for the last 12 months if you’re a citizen of an EEA country – you need to provide a permanent residence document
not broken any immigration laws while in the UK

Classes of British nationality

FEES WITH EFFECT FROM 18 MARCH 2016 FOR CITIZENSHIP APPLICATIONS:
ADULTS APPLYING FOR BRITISH CITIZENSHIP.

Naturalisation –  £1236
Registration – £1121
registration (ceremony fee only) – £80

For more information about British Nationality and Citizenship  contact JRR.

Useful links:

https://www.gov.uk/types-of-british-nationality

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/507609/Master_Fees_Leaflet_2016_03_08_v0_3.pdf

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_nationality_law


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IELTS ( What, Why and How)

Category : IELTS

What is the IELTS?

IELTS is the International English Language Testing System which tests English proficiency across the globe. Conducting 2 million tests in the past year, IELTS is the world’s most popular high stakes English-language test for study, work and migration.

Two types of IELTS test :

IELTS Academic

IELTS Academic is for people planning to study in higher education or seeking professional registration. It assesses whether you are ready to begin studying or training in an environment where English is the language used.  IELTS Academic doesn’t assume that test takers have already mastered (or even partly have) the range of skills they are likely to need at college or university. For this reason, while the test reflects some of the features of academic language, it does not aim to simulate academic study tasks in their entirety. This approach is widely supported by the institutions that recognise IELTS.

IELTS General Training

IELTS General Training focuses on basic survival skills in broad social and workplace contexts. It is typically for those who are going to English-speaking countries to do secondary education, work experience or training programs. People migrating to Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the UK must take the General Training test. It should be noted that professional organisations normally require an Academic test result for registration and migration purposes.

Test format:

The IELTS test assesses your abilities in all four skills – listening, reading, writing and speaking – in under three hours.
IELTS is available in two test formats: Academic or General Training. There are four parts – Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking. The total test time is 2 hours and 45 minutes.
All test takers take the same Listening and Speaking tests but different Reading and Writing tests. The distinction between IELTS Academic and IELTS General Training lies in the subject matter of the Reading and Writing components.
Listening, Reading and Writing must be completed on the same day, with no breaks in between them. The order in which these tests are taken may vary.
The Speaking test will either be after a break on the same day as the other three tests, or up to a week before or after the other tests. This will depend on your test centre.
How IELTS is scored

IELTS results are reported on a 9-band scale

Band score

Skill level

Description

9 Expert user The test taker has fully operational command of the language. Their use of English is appropriate, accurate and fluent, and shows complete understanding.
8 Very good user The test taker has fully operational command of the language with only occasional unsystematic inaccuracies and inappropriate usage. They may misunderstand some things in unfamiliar situations. They handle complex and detailed argumentation well.
7 Good user The test taker has operational command of the language, though with occasional inaccuracies, inappropriate usage and misunderstandings in some situations. They generally handle complex language well and understand detailed reasoning.
6 Competent user The test taker has an effective command of the language despite some inaccuracies, inappropriate usage and misunderstandings. They can use and understand fairly complex language, particularly in familiar situations.
5 Modest user The test taker has a partial command of the language and copes with overall meaning in most situations, although they are likely to make many mistakes. They should be able to handle basic communication in their own field.
4 Limited user The test taker’s basic competence is limited to familiar situations. They frequently show problems in understanding and expression. They are not able to use complex language.
3 Extremely limited user The test taker conveys and understands only general meaning in very familiar situations. There are frequent breakdowns in communication.
2 Intermittent user The test taker has great difficulty understanding spoken and written English.
1 Non-user The test taker has no ability to use the language except a few isolated words.
0 Did not attempt test The test taker did not answer the questions.

IELTS results are designed to be simple and easy to understand. Results are reported as band scores on a scale from 1 (the lowest) to 9 (the highest). The IELTS band scale has remained consistent and has acquired currency around the world over the past three decades.

For more information about IELTS :

About IELTS fee/test center contact JRR

Useful links :

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/544664/2016-08-08_-_SELT_frequently_asked_questions_for_candidates_v1.2.pdf

https://www.britishcouncil.in/exam/ielts


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Visit/Tourist/Business Visa for UK

Category : UK

Documents Required:
Visit Visa Application form
Passport
Invitation / Sponsorship / Business offer letter
Purpose of visit – tourist / family visit/ business
Accommodation – Tenancy agreement/ title deeds/ hotel accommodation
Sponsor details – Passports / Employment proof/ bank statements / relationship details
Applicant information – Personal status – student / employee / business proof details / six month bank statements / leave letter from employee/ college/school if any / income proof – salary slips/ bank statements / Fixed deposits etc./ business proof- Partnership deed / incorporation certificate
T.B. Test medical certificate (Above six months stay)

 

Visa Application fee
Short term for Six months        –     Rs.7,830/-
Longer term valid for two years        –    Rs.29,700/-
Longer term valid for five years        –    Rs. 54,000/-
Longer term valid for ten years        –    Rs. 67,680/-

Visa will be granted on the said documents within two weeks from the date of submission.
For more information in regard to UK Visas – Call 040 65150789


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